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21. Charmont Apartments, 1929  21.Charmont Apartments, 1929
330 California Ave. National Register of Historic Places
Between 1920 and 1930, the population of Los Angeles County grew from 936,434 to 2,208,492 and people wanted to live by the beach.
22. Miles Playhouse, 1929  22. Miles Playhouse, 1929
1130, Lincoln Blvd.
Several legends surround the endowment of the Miles Playhouse.
23. Streamline Moderne Commercial Building, 1940  23. Streamline Moderne Commercial Building, 1940
507 Wilshire Blvd.
Old timers will remember 507 Wilshire Blvd. as the LLO-DA-MAR Bowl.
24. Santa Monica Bay Woman’s Club Building, 1914  24. Santa Monica Bay Woman’s Club Building, 1914
1210 Fourth St.
Architect Henry Hollwedel is noteworthy for both his professional and civic contributions to Santa Monica in the early part of the century.
25. Gussie Moran House, circa 1891  25. Gussie Moran House, circa 1891
1323 Ocean Ave.
This Queen Anne style Victorian hints the time when Ocean Avenue was a parade of Victorian homes, and was once owned by international tennis sensation Gussie Moran.
26. Victorian House, 1906  26. Victorian House, 1906
1333 Ocean Ave.
When you see this Queen Anne-inspired Victorian, think back on the day when Ocean Avenue was a eucalyptus-lined street dotted with fashionable residences.
27. Georgian Hotel, 1931  27. Georgian Hotel, 1931
1415 Ocean Ave.
During prohibition, the Georgian became one of Los Angeles' first speakeasies; a rendezvous spot for celebrities including Clark Gable, Carole Lombard, Bugsy Siegel and Fatty Arbuckle.
28. Rapp Saloon/Old Town Hall, 1875  28. Rapp Saloon/Old Town Hall, 1875
1438 Second St.
This one-story structure was the first masonry structure in Santa Monica.
29. Mayfair Theatre, 1911  29. Mayfair Theatre, 1911
212-216 Santa Monica Blvd.
Legend had it that the theatre, originally erected in 1911, was the oldest legitimate theater operating in Los Angeles.
30. Oregon Avenue Sidewalk Sign, pre 1912  30. Oregon Avenue Sidewalk Sign, pre 1912
Santa Monica Boulevard and Fifth Street
This corner sidewalk inlay illustrates how street labeling looked at the turn of the 20th Century.
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